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Researching the Brain, Seeking Cures

Autism may not be a spectrum but may be better understood as several interrelated spectra, suggests a new Stony Brook University-led study.
Adolescent athletes who sustained concussions while playing a sport recovered more quickly when they underwent a supervised, aerobic exercise regimen, a study published today in JAMA Pediatrics has found.
A team of UCLA-led scientists has discovered important clues to what goes wrong in the brains of people with autism — a developmental disorder with no cure and for which scientists have no deep understanding of what causes it.
Harvard Medical School geneticists have created a new model-in-a-dish of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease that removes a major obstacle for scientists seeking to pinpoint the causes of sporadic Alzheimer’s and find drugs that might prevent or reverse its devastating neurodegenerative effects.
In a new study, USC researchers used machine learning to identify potential blood-based markers of Alzheimer’s disease that could help with earlier diagnosis and tracking the progress of the disease.
In a first-in-world clinical trial, researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine are studying how well-focused ultrasound surgery works in adults with a specific type of epilepsy whose seizures are not controlled by medication.
A Michigan State University College of Human Medicine psychiatrist has found that most patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder are willing to use a smartphone application to help manage their symptoms, including after regular clinic hours.
A simple blood test reliably detects signs of brain damage in people on the path to developing Alzheimer’s disease – even before they show signs of confusion and memory loss, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases in Germany.
A detailed study of four mouse models of autism challenges the most common assumption about what goes wrong in brain circuits to cause disease symptoms.
Leaky capillaries in the brain portend early onset of Alzheimer’s disease as they signal cognitive impairment before hallmark toxic proteins appear, new USC research shows.