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An international team of scientists led by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine employed an array of next-generation sequencing and gene-editing tools, such as CRISPR, to map the molecular dependencies —and thus vulnerabilities — of pancreatic cancer stem cells.
Primitive ponds may have provided a suitable environment for brewing up Earth’s first life forms, more so than oceans, a new MIT study finds.
A University of Wisconsin–Madison team reports the development of a novel strategy capable of extracting and driving hard-to-reach proteins into water solution where they can be effectively studied using mass spectrometry, a powerful analytical technique.
A Princeton-led team of researchers has discovered a factor that promotes the spread of cancers to bone, opening the way toward treatments that could mitigate cancer’s ability to colonize bone.
Working with human colon cancer cells and mice, researchers led by experts at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have successfully blocked the activity of portions of a protein known as UHRF1 and restored the function of hundreds of cancer-fighting genes that became “misregulated” by the disease.
Princeton University scientists, working with a Harvard graduate student, is for the first time applying deep learning — a powerful new version of the machine learning form of AI — to forecast sudden disruptions that can halt fusion reactions and damage the doughnut-shaped tokamaks that house the reactions.
Brown University scientists have captured the first “snapshot” of two proteins involved in delivering a bacterial stress-response master regulator to the cell’s recycling machinery.
Scientists from Johns Hopkins, Stanford University, and other U.S. institutions has found no long-lasting, major differences between the epigenomes of astronaut Scott Kelly, who spent a year in space aboard the International Space Station, and his twin brother, Mark, who remained on Earth.
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison have developed a prototype system that maps out trends in antibiotic resistance across Wisconsin.
Rising global maritime traffic could lead to sharp increases in invasive species around the world over the next 30 years, according to a new study by McGill University researchers.