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A Yale-led team of researchers developed a new approach to scanning the brain for changes in synapses that are associated with common brain disorders. The technique may provide insights into the diagnosis and treatment of a broad range of disorders, including epilepsy and Alzheimer’s disease.
Henderson, along with his former graduate student Divita Mathur, studies how to build nanomachines that may have real-world medical applications someday soon. He and Mathur recently published an article in the peer-reviewed Scientific Reports describing his laboratory’s successful effort to design a nanomachine capable of detecting a mockup of the Ebola virus.
Prism goggles trick the brain into rewiring the visual cortex, providing insight into its plasticity.
Without having to learn new technical skills or adapt to changes in the operating room, surgeons get a better view of blood flowing inside vessels and a better view of tissues, thanks to new microscopy technology developed at the UA.
A new technology has promise to safely find buried plastic explosives and maybe even spot fast-growing tumors. The technique involves the clever interplay of microwaves and ultrasound to develop a detector like the Star Trek tricorder.
In a new paper in Tissue Engineering: Part C, Brown University researchers describe a relatively accessible method for making a working – though not thinking – sphere of central nervous system tissue. The advance could provide an inexpensive and easy-to-make 3-D testbed for biomedical research.
Scientists have developed a faster, cheaper and more biologically relevant way to screen drugs and chemicals in the developing brain.