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Stanford University

The same technologies that people once blamed for tearing society apart might be our best chance of staying together during the COVID-19 outbreak, says Stanford’s Jamil Zaki.
Last week, Harvard University President Lawrence S. Bacow, Massachusetts Institute of Technology President L. Rafael Reif, and Stanford University President Marc Tessier-Lavigne wrote an op-ed to outline the importance of “drastic action” to protect the health of our nation, including the efforts of America’s leading research universities.
Stanford University data scientists have shown that figuring out a single number can help them find the most dangerous cancer cells.
Immunotherapy has great promise as a cancer treatment, but current therapies only work in some. Now, Stanford researchers are testing the idea that microorganisms in our guts might be the deciding factor.
Stanford University researchers have found a way to predict who will suffer heart problems from a common breast-cancer drug, as well as identified an FDA-approved medication that could mitigate those side effects.
Synthetic proteins engineered to recognize overly active biological pathways can kill cancer cells while sparing their healthy peers, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
Stanford University scientists were able to engineer immune cells known as macrophages to detect and flag cancer in mice. The researchers hope the technique can be used for early cancer diagnostics in humans.
Up to 80% of metastatic colorectal cancers are likely to have spread to distant locations in the body before the original tumor has exceeded the size of a poppy seed, according to a study of nearly 3,000 patients by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
A large study of women with breast and ovarian cancer has revealed significant gaps between national guidelines for genetic testing and actual testing practices, according to researchers from Stanford and five other institutions.
Some breast cancers return decades later. Now, a researcher at Stanford University, joined by collaborators at several other institutions, has subcategorized tumors to predict recurrence, guide treatment decisions and improve drug development.