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Energy Conservation/Efficiency

Stanford professor is working on innovative cooling technology that could be the future of lower-energy air conditioning and refrigeration.
Tulane University researchers have discovered a new magnetic topological semimetal that could one day lead to more energy-efficient computers, televisions, cellphones and other electronics.
As the climate warms globally, residential consumers could face increases in electricity bills of 12 percent, and commercial consumers could see increases of 9 percent, according to Boston University researchers.
Northwestern’s first-ever entry into the eighth U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon will be a student-designed 1,000-square-foot ultimate green home.
Cellphones and other devices could soon be controlled with touchless gestures and charge using ambient light.
Hausman and colleagues urge electric grid planners to keep their calculations in mind as they draft 20-year procurement plans.
Electrical engineers at Duke University have created the world's first electromagnetic metamaterial made without any metal. The device's ability to absorb electromagnetic energy without heating up has direct applications in imaging, sensing and lighting.
Princeton engineering researchers have illuminated another path forward for LED technologies by refining the manufacturing of light sources made with crystalline substances known as perovskites, a more efficient and potentially lower-cost alternative to materials used in LEDs found on store shelves.
A team of UC Davis students are tackling the California drought through innovative housing design with their entry for the U.S. Department of Energy’s 2017 Solar Decathlon.
At Northwestern, Tracy Lohr, Research Assistant Professor of Chemistry, is experimenting with a new method of commercial formaldehyde production—one that is completely energy neutral.