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Research to Secure Our Energy Future

Windows that can collect solar energy, called photovoltaic windows, are the next frontier in renewable energy technologies.
Cellphones and other devices could soon be controlled with touchless gestures and charge using ambient light.
Hausman and colleagues urge electric grid planners to keep their calculations in mind as they draft 20-year procurement plans.
Chemists at the University of Pennsylvania are expanding a new model that could be the first step towards better harnessing heat energy to power nanoscale devices.
Electrical engineers at Duke University have created the world's first electromagnetic metamaterial made without any metal. The device's ability to absorb electromagnetic energy without heating up has direct applications in imaging, sensing and lighting.
University engineers are using the pilot plant to develop and demonstrate an advanced biorenewables technology called solvent liquefaction.
A Vanderbilt research team created the world’s first steel-brass battery that can store energy at levels comparable to lead-acid batteries while charging and discharging at rates comparable to ultra-fast charging supercapacitors.
Princeton engineering researchers have illuminated another path forward for LED technologies by refining the manufacturing of light sources made with crystalline substances known as perovskites, a more efficient and potentially lower-cost alternative to materials used in LEDs found on store shelves.
MIT engineers have genetically reprogrammed a strain of yeast that could make possible the renewable production of high-energy fuels.
The same researchers who pioneered the use of a quantum mechanical effect to convert heat into electricity have figured out how to make their technique work in a form more suitable to industry.