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Protecting Systems

A team of computer scientists is working to defend against the next potential cyber risk – cloud storage.
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a decoy robot designed to keep factories and other large facilities safe from hackers.
USC researchers have developed a powerful tool using pulses of light to translate and protect data.
A new software system being developed by cybersecurity researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology will largely automate the process of assessing the extent of network or computer system attacks.
A team of MIT researchers has developed a new technique to defend multirobot systems such as delivery drones from hackers.
University of Arizona Associate Professor Roman Lysecky is pioneering technologies to protect implantable medical devices (IMDs) from hackers.
“Analyst-driven solutions” rely on rules created by living experts and miss attacks that don’t match the rules. Machine-learning approaches rely on “anomaly detection,” which triggers false positives needing investigation by humans.
Researchers are studying how human voices are unique to help identify devices on electrical grid control networks, using their unique electronic “voices” to determine which signals are legitimate and which signals might be from attackers.
Vitaly Shmatikov thinks computer security experts and pranksters have a lot in common. “The nice thing about being a security researcher,” he says, “is that you’re sort of paid to be a troublemaker. You are kind of paid to do things that other people don’t want to do and don’t want to think about. For a certain type of personality, this is a very good match.”
Can unpredictability protect computers against malware? We want our computers to perform the way we expect. But what if the key to defeating malware is introducing a bit of chaos? We want our computers to perform the way we expect. But what if the key to defeating malware is introducing a bit of chaos?