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The University of Wisconsin-Madison

Rebecca Blank, chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, writes about Bucky's Tuition Promise, an expansion of the school's efforts to ensure that an education at the state's flagship public university is accessible to Wisconsin students and affordable for their families.
Rebecca Blank, chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Brad Schwartz, CEO of the biomedical Morgridge Institute for Research in Madison, wrote in support of basic science in this commentary published by The Hill.
Two University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have developed a device that essentially automates the cranberry-counting process.
"If America wants to maintain its innovative edge, create meaningful jobs and realize economic growth, then we must make funding for basic science a national and state priority," according to Rebecca Blank, chancellor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Marsha Mailick, vice chancellor for research and graduate education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Indiana University President Michael A. McRobbie and several of his Big Ten and AAU presidential colleagues met April 25 on Capitol Hill with U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan.
One illustrious career in computer sciences at the University of Wisconsin–Madison can be traced to an anxious mother, a cocktail party conversation, and a “dead boring” job — plus a fascination with low-level machine code, a subject that many computer scientists disdain.
A University of Wisconsin–Madison startup is helping Midwest cities remove pollutants from wastewater through a new process that will benefit local farmers, too.
The University of Wisconsin-Madison's (UW-Madison) Delta Program in Research, Teaching, and Learning promotes professional development in teaching for graduate students and post-docs so that they can successfully implement and advance effective teaching practices for diverse student audiences as part of their careers.
First-Year Interest Groups (FIGs) are designed to help first-year students make the transition to UW-Madison, both academically and socially. A FIG is a "learning community" of about 20 students with similar interests who are enrolled in a cluster of classes together.