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University of California, Los Angeles

We doubt the critics, reject the status quo and see opportunity in dissatisfaction. Our campus, faculty and students are driven by optimism. It is not naïve; it is essential. And it has fueled every accomplishment, allowing us to redefine what's possible, time after time.

This can-do perspective has brought us 13 Nobel Prizes, 12 MacArthur Fellows, more NCAA titles than any university and more Olympic medals than most nations. Our faculty and alumni helped create the Internet and pioneered reverse osmosis. And more than 140 companies have been created based on technology developed at UCLA.

What inspires MacArthur Fellows and Rhodes Scholars? What gave Jackie Robinson the courage to become the first African American in Major League Baseball? What was the catalyst that spurred Vint Cerf and Leonard Kleinrock's dream of the Internet?

The answer is optimism. And it is in our DNA.

 

University of Southern California researchers have found a new technique that could play a big part in eliminating osteonecrosis of the jaw, a currently incurable rare side effect of certain drugs.
Engineers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering and their colleagues have developed an adhesive gel that can encourage the surface of the eye, known as the cornea, to heal itself following an injury.
Tulane University assistant professor Damian Murray collaborated on a research project with a group from UCLA to study how falling in love influences the immune system in women.
A team of UCLA-led scientists has discovered important clues to what goes wrong in the brains of people with autism — a developmental disorder with no cure and for which scientists have no deep understanding of what causes it.
UCLA researchers have found that people involved in electric scooter accidents are sometimes injured badly enough — from fractures, dislocated joints and head injuries — to require treatment in an emergency department.
Toxic protein assemblies, or “amyloids,” long considered to be key drivers in many neuromuscular diseases, also play a beneficial role in the development of healthy muscle tissue, CU Boulder researchers have found.
UCLA biologists report they have transferred a memory from one marine snail to another, creating an artificial memory, by injecting RNA from one to another.
UCLA biochemists have achieved a first in biology: viewing at near-atomic detail the smallest protein ever seen, using a technique called cryo-electron microscopy.
An international team of researchers led by scientists at UCLA has discovered that bacteria have a “memory” that passes sensory knowledge from one generation of cells to the next, all without a central nervous system or any neurons.
UCLA researchers have engineered a type of synthetic protein that shows great promise for helping the body’s immune system seek out and destroy cancer.