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Stanford University

Stanford University, located between San Francisco and San Jose in the heart of California's Silicon Valley, is one of the world's leading teaching and research universities. Since its opening in 1891, Stanford has been dedicated to finding solutions to big challenges and to preparing students for leadership in a complex world.

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Stanford scientists knew that plants wage chemical war against bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Now they’ve learned how to “vaccinate” tomato plants with a natural chemical to boost their defenses against a pest that makes leaves shrivel up and die.
A new way to convert carbon dioxide into the building block for sustainable liquid fuels was very efficient in tests and did not have the reaction that destroys the conventional device.
Stanford University researchers found that scooping the guts out of bacteria and refilling them with an expansive fluid, scientists can discover whether a microbe is structurally strong or weak, gaining insights that could help fight infectious diseases or aid studies of the beneficial bacterial communities known as microbiomes.
A preventive treatment developed by Stanford researchers could greatly reduce the incidence and severity of wildfires
A new process created by Stanford University researchers shows promise in turning the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide back into usable fuels, and yields four times as much fuel as previous approaches.
Scientists at Stanford have identified molecules that tough microbes use to survive in warming waters, opening a window more broadly into studying conditions in ancient seas.
A new technique from Stanford University employs a bright infrared light that can pass through millimeters of tissue to illuminate tumors deep inside the body.
Stanford University researchers find that in human cell cultures, countering a defect that appears to be nearly universal among patients with Parkinson’s disease prevents death in the cells whose loss causes the disease.
A Stanford study predicts a tripling of storm-related damages in the Bahamas if protective ecosystems such as coral reefs and mangrove forests are degraded or lost.
Disabling a single, apparently noncritical protein in cells may foil replication of the viruses that cause half of all common colds, polio and other diseases, according to researchers at Stanford and UCSF.