topSkip to main content

Menu, Secondary

Menu Trigger

Menu

Tulane University

Since beginning as a medical college in 1834, we’ve grown into one of the most well-respected research universities in the country. We’re one of just 62 members of the Association of American Universities, an elite group of top-ranked research institutions.

But we’re hardly an ivory-tower, view-from-40,000-feet kind of place. Yes, you’ll find a lot of intellectual firepower on campus. Our faculty are involved in projects as diverse as protecting the aquatic resources of the Gulf and chronicling the region’s singular musical heritage. But because of our size – just 8,452 undergrads; classes average 21 students – you won’t be looking at that academic talent from afar. The brilliant faculty who are carrying out that work also happen to be eager, nurturing educators, and they’ll be teaching your classes from the minute you arrive.

Visit the Tulane University website.

University leaders, including half a dozen AAU presidents, fear they are losing public and political support at an alarming rate, and say they must do more to counter charges of elitism in this Politco article.
Michael A. Fitts, president of Tulane University, said higher education leaders could use help from parents with the growing problem of alcohol and drug abuse on campus in this opinion piece for Fox News.
The bacteria that causes Lyme disease can survive in organ tissue after treatment with a full course of antibiotics months after infection, according to a new primate study of the disease by Tulane University researchers.
A Tulane University researcher who studies bird migration has found that a decline in the number of wood thrushes is probably due to deforestation in Central America, not to the loss and degrading of forest in the United States where the songbird breeds.
A Tulane University geologist is among a team of scientists studying an ancient Canadian ice sheet to determine if its collapse could be a preview of future climate change.
Tulane University researchers have developed a new drug that is effective against non-severe cases of malaria, according to results from a FDA-supervised clinical trial.
Tulane student Sarah Oliva hopes her research will help protect people living in the East African rift system from volcanoes and earthquakes.
Researchers at the Tulane Brain Institute say they have moved a step closer to improving treatment for chronic depression.
Tulane researchers are testing a strategy to alter the genes of female Aedes aegypti mosquitos so they die soon after a blood meal.
Tulane sophomore James Rogers spent his summer as an intern at the National Institutes of Health where he conducted research on the total number of mutations found in a small subset of rare central nervous system tumor patients.