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The Johns Hopkins University

“What are we aiming at?”

That’s the question our first president, Daniel Coit Gilman, asked at his inauguration in 1876. What is this place all about, exactly? His answer:

“The encouragement of research . . . and the advancement of individual scholars, who by their excellence will advance the sciences they pursue, and the society where they dwell.”

Gilman believed that teaching and research go hand in hand—that success in one depends on success in the other—and that a modern university must do both well. He also believed that sharing our knowledge and discoveries would help make the world a better place.

Visit The Johns Hopkins University website.

Two of every three participants in a U.S. consumer survey report that they are eating less of at least one type of meat, according to a study conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future.
Aging adults who report being very sleepy during the day were nearly three times more likely to have brain deposits of beta amyloid, a protein that's a hallmark for Alzheimer's disease, according to a recent report.
Researchers say new experiments using magnetic pulse brain stimulation on people with moderate to severe restless legs syndrome (RLS) may help devise safer, more effective treatments.
An analysis of more than 1,000 people with and without psychiatric disorders has shown that nitrates—chemicals used to cure meats such as beef jerky, salami, hot dogs and other processed meat snacks—may contribute to mania, an abnormal mood state.
Researchers have created 'electronic skin' that will enable amputees to perceive through prosthetic fingertips.
Jennifer Haythornthwaite teaches the Pain Care Medicine course that's required for all first-year Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine students.
A common diabetes drug has the potential to alleviate symptoms of nicotine withdrawal, according to a study with mice.
Despite seeing it millions of times in pretty much every picture book, every novel, every newspaper and every email, Johns Hopkins University researchers have found people are essentially unaware of the most common version of the lowercase print g.
Despite the threat of a global antibiotic-resistance crisis, the worldwide use of antibiotics in humans soared 39 percent between 2000 and 2015, according to a new study.
The brain can detect an object’s value almost as soon as we see it, according to a team of researchers at Johns Hopkins University.