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The Johns Hopkins University

“What are we aiming at?”

That’s the question our first president, Daniel Coit Gilman, asked at his inauguration in 1876. What is this place all about, exactly? His answer:

“The encouragement of research . . . and the advancement of individual scholars, who by their excellence will advance the sciences they pursue, and the society where they dwell.”

Gilman believed that teaching and research go hand in hand—that success in one depends on success in the other—and that a modern university must do both well. He also believed that sharing our knowledge and discoveries would help make the world a better place.

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Researchers have created 'electronic skin' that will enable amputees to perceive through prosthetic fingertips.
Jennifer Haythornthwaite teaches the Pain Care Medicine course that's required for all first-year Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine students.
A common diabetes drug has the potential to alleviate symptoms of nicotine withdrawal, according to a study with mice.
Despite seeing it millions of times in pretty much every picture book, every novel, every newspaper and every email, Johns Hopkins University researchers have found people are essentially unaware of the most common version of the lowercase print g.
Despite the threat of a global antibiotic-resistance crisis, the worldwide use of antibiotics in humans soared 39 percent between 2000 and 2015, according to a new study.
The brain can detect an object’s value almost as soon as we see it, according to a team of researchers at Johns Hopkins University.
A study to assess the feasibility of checking illicit street drugs for fentanyl found that low-cost test strips detect the presence of fentanyl with a high degree of accuracy, and that the vast majority of people who use street drugs are interested in using drug checking to help prevent overdoses.
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a single blood test that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer.
Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered a potential means of stalling or even reversing diabetes-related blindness.
The natural decline in lung function over a 10-year period was slower among former smokers with a diet high in tomatoes and fruits, especially apples, according to a study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.