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Vanderbilt University

Cornelius Vanderbilt had a vision of a place that would “contribute to strengthening the ties that should exist between all sections of our common country” when he gave $1 million to create a university in 1873.

Today that vision has been realized in Vanderbilt, an internationally recognized research university in Nashville, Tennessee, with strong partnerships among its 10 schools, neighboring institutions and the community.

Vanderbilt offers undergraduate programs in the liberal arts and sciences, engineering, music, education and human development, as well as a full range of graduate and professional degrees. The combination of cutting-edge research, liberal arts education, nationally recognized schools of law, business, medicine, nursing and divinity, and one of the nation's top-ranked graduate schools of education creates an invigorating atmosphere where students tailor their education to meet their goals and researchers collaborate to address the complex questions affecting our health, culture and society.

Visit the Vanderbilt University website.

 

Vanderbilt University engineers have combined the science of biomechanics with advances in wearable tech to create a smart, mechanized undergarment that prevents back stress.
Vanderbilt University researchers believe a drug originally designed for rheumatoid arthritis may be the first drug to treat calcification of heart valves.
Nicholas S. Zeppos, chancellor of Vanderbilt University, calls on Congress to once again protect a government-university partnership that has produced "breakthrough upon breakthrough."
A Vanderbilt research team created the world’s first steel-brass battery that can store energy at levels comparable to lead-acid batteries while charging and discharging at rates comparable to ultra-fast charging supercapacitors.
People with Alzheimer’s disease don’t perceive pain as readily as healthy older adults, and this may lead to delays and underreporting of pain.
Fecal transplants are increasingly being used as the treatment of last resort for certain infections in the human gut and have had remarkable success treating the nursing home and hospital-acquired scourge, Clostridium difficile colitis, an infectious diarrhea that often follows antibiotic treatment.
How about shrink wrapping your hand to have an MRI? Or having a light in a cast to help heal diabetic foot ulcers? These are just some of a record number of design projects developed by Vanderbilt Engineering students for Design Day 2016.
Applying mild electrical stimulation to an area of the brain associated with cognitive control helps people with schizophrenia to recognize errors and adjust their behavior to avoid them as much as it helps healthy subjects do so, according to a new study by Vanderbilt psychologists.
Every time you make a memory, somewhere in your brain a tiny filament reaches out from one neuron and forms an electrochemical connection to a neighboring neuron. Biologists study how these connections are formed at the molecular and cellular level.
A Vanderbilt University undergraduate student joined a team of researchers to study the sensory systems of disease-transmitting mosquitoes. His team ended up discovering that mosquito sperm have a sense of smell.